Questions to Ask at a Job Interview

A list of questions you should ask during your job interview.

Questions to Ask at a Job Interview.

 

I came across this list of questions on Pinterest - the current source of everything worth knowing. The full article was written by Erika Brandt, Marketing and Communications Manager for AgCareers.com.

What struck me about the list was how dramatically different my life might be if I had asked even a few of them when I was interviewed for some of the jobs I've had.

An unhappy work environment matters. It can squash employees' initiative and derail the mission away from long term organizational goals in favor of placating supervisors from moment-to-moment.

Performance measurement is another sticky subject. What if they told you performance would be measured not by the list of tasks in the job description but by your ability to navigate someone's mood swings? Or that you'd be required to fill out a twenty page performance review sheet each year, that your review would always be three months late, and that your supervisor spends less than ten minutes reviewing your prepared documents beforehand?

I'm not naive enough to believe that an interviewer would give away some of the more complicated (and unhappy) nuances of the corporate culture, but looking back I'd rather like to see how interviewers reacted when asked to describe it.

Looking back, I think body language is one of the most telling (and overlooked) clues to corporate culture. I remember visiting an office over the course of several interviews and noticed that no one was talking or smiling. The HR assistant was visibly unhappy and unpleasant to work with over the course of the two month interview process. Of course I took the job. And of course it was just the tip of the misery iceberg.

During an interview at another company I noticed that the office environment was complete chaos. The interviewers were unprepared and seemed to just ask questions that came into mind instead of probing for specific skills and responses. Employees randomly wandered around interrupting one another and our interview, which was happening in the middle of a busy room. One person scheduled to be part of the interview process was unable to leave her desk because no one else would answer the phones.Of course I took the job. And of course the crazy I observed in that brief time in the office was only the tip of the chaos iceberg.

I love this list of questions and I hope you'll ask them at your next interview. I would also like to suggest that you carefully observe the office on the days you visit. Consider that what you see is the office on their "best behavior." And decide whether or not you can live with that behavior pushed all the way to the far edge. It's difficult to do when you need a job, but saying "no" to a miserable work environment can be the difference between a good life and, well...

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Five Ways to Make Your Mark on the World

This three-minute video from Box of Crayons shows us five ways we can make our mark on the world.

 

I don't know about you, but I really struggle to identify what it is, exactly, that I'm "good" at or what sets me free. I'm "good," in a way, at sorting out other people's problems or taking care of things they don't want to do - but I'm not sure it's really that good for me.

I don't want to look in the shadows. I know that the answer is that I must look anyway -  but that's easier said than done. What I know is lurking there scares me. The number one thought I've had lately is that I don't care nearly as much about [specific] things as I once believed. This sets chaos in motion as I work to redefine how my life has been organized up until now. It's painful for me and for those around me, I suppose.

There's no spray for that. Just a great deal of agonized journaling, I suppose (since I can't afford therapy). And, quite frankly, I quit journaling some years ago. And I don't mean to be flip - I'm being realistic. I'm 42, I'm on a budget, and I have to be candid about who and what I am able to change. But 42 isn't 82, there's still time. Right? Right. The question is where to start.

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