Stop Bad Days: A Great Post via ooomf Blog

 

Andrea Ayres wrote a great piece for the ooomf Blog with helpful suggestions about how to end "bad" days. I love that she included reading on her list! I know a few minutes with a good book or short story will often cure my creative blocks in the office. My theory is that it wakes up a different part of my brain - the part I need to use to write (which is 90 percent of what I really do.) Do you have any strategies to help yourself feel better on a bad day? Do you have any book recs for me? Click here to read the complete post - it's well worth your time!

Oh, and...if you're depressed... order a Mood Spray. I just mixed a fresh order of Apathy - and the pink grapefruit in this batch is the brightest and freshest yet.

 

--Heidi

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Why I don't "Crowdfund" or use Kickstarter

Heidi Rettig's Faux leopard coat and vintage bag.

This photo has absolutely nothing to do with mood sprays or crowd funding. I just wanted to show you my vintage faux leopard coat and the red bag I bought in Paris fifteen years ago.

Now, on to the point:

Every once in awhile a friend will ask me why I don't put the Anti-Bad-Mood Sprays on Kickstarter. I have vision for my products beyond what you see here (mostly marketing and sample sizes) but it's tough to leverage the cash to make some of those dreams come true.The crowdfunding concept is attractive and Kickstarter's success stories would make any entrepreneur want to try for the gold.

But here's what I've learned after working in philanthropy: there's no such thing as "free money." Here's another thing I've learned from a decade of helping nonprofits raise money: You can ask for money but you can only ask one time. No - really.

Think of it this way and your successful grant applications will noticeably increase: If you have just one opportunity to connect with a funding source - are you ready? Can you present a carefully thought out idea (you would be surprised how many people believe that a casual social relationship with a funder will be more important than have an actual idea to discuss.) Does your work fit the donor's funding interests? Is it a quality product? Will you pursue the goal with or without funders' support? Do you have the skills to pull any of it off? Because if you're not ready even though you swore you would be then you can't ask again. If you do get the money then you have a set of responsibilities to the donor. Are you prepared for that?

So much energy goes into the creative presentation of ideas - that's a truly beautiful thing and crowd funders do that really well. Where it often falls apart is on delivery. Because happens when you accept support but your end product is just, kind of..."meh"...? What happens when the idea never comes to fruition? That's powerful information you're sending to your community of supporters about your products and your abilities to pull it off. Botch it and you'll never be able to ask again.

If you've given support to more than one Kickstarter project the chances are you've received something pretty average in return. Okay, it's a gamble and not every gamble pays off. But would you give money to that entrepreneur again? Or just look for someone else the next time around?

Also, my experience has been that people get tired of the "ask." How many times have you received an email from a cause promising that they'll never ask you for money again? Never is as long as it takes for the next email to arrive, just a couple of months later. Like a guy on the street corner with a cup out - passerby eventually become indifferent to his plight. In the case of nonprofit arts, I don't think that your email list makes any distinction between the tickets you're selling as an "ask" and the quarterly plea for donations. An "ask" is an "ask." They will become indifferent to repeated requests. So what do you want the most from them? Ask for that. One time.

I don't crowd fund because I'd rather just sell you my truly beautiful thing - my Mood Sprays - because I am pretty confident you will enjoy the scent, the luxury packaging, and the humor on the labels. If you enjoy them you will return to the website for more. Mood Sprays are a real idea, in the marketplace, for real-time feedback. And the feedback and support from customers is incredibly satisfying. (Best "starter" mood spray for the novice user: Apathy - smells like fresh-peeled grapefruit!)

I so appreciate my relationships with the folks who have taken a chance on my products - it has been wonderful to get to know all of you and your candor over the past two years has helped me refine the project in so many important ways. Good reviews give me energy for the next steps. Thank you!

I feel good about every box I ship - I've hand-blended every bottle and I know that if it smells good enough for me it smells good enough for you. So, I guess from that point of view, I could feel confident about putting my work up on a crowd funding site. But honestly - it feels so much better when you buy Mood Sprays just because you enjoy them! Thanks for listening.

[steps off soapbox]

Heidi

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Gretchen Rubin's Happiness Projects: Happier at Home in 21 Days or Less?

It's hard to disturb Kiki and White Kitty just to make the bed.

 

I've never read a book by Gretchen Rubin and yet...I love everything she has to say. She is a master at sharing helpful content on the Internet. You really must visit her website or subscribe to her monthly emails.

I started making my bed each day after Gretchen Rubin advised that making your bed was [oddly] linked to happiness. I did make my bed, but only if it didn't disturb the kitties snuggled up in the blankets.

So, following Rubin's advice, I started making the bed religiously. In spite of the kitties. And making the bed often extended into a quick tidy of the bedroom in general. (Which, by the way, involves a quick spray of Apathy aromatherapy spray to clean the air.) And when I come in to a calm, clean bedroom at the end of the day...I find I AM happier. Oddly enough.

Gretchen Rubin has a new series of "21 Day Projects" to help you find more happiness at home. There's one on de-cluttering; one to help you stop yelling at your kids; one to improve your relationship; and the one I'm going to try - "Getting to Know Yourself Better." Seems so relevant as I process the artifacts of my past lives and try to figure out what happens next. Each program is $4.99 - but the relationship series is free.

If you sign up for one, let me know. Maybe we can digest and share our findings by email?

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How to Use Anti Bad Mood Aromatherapy Room Sprays.

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